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42 books about Corporations [sort by author]      

ABA Fundamentals: Understanding Your Business Clients
Bert Spector
American Bar Association Publishing, 2013

Asymmetric Information, Corporate Finance, and Investment
Edited by R. Glenn Hubbard
University of Chicago Press, 1990

In this volume, specialists from traditionally separate areas in economics and finance investigate issues at the conjunction of their fields. They argue that financial decisions of the firm can affect real economic activity—and this is true for enough firms and consumers to have significant aggregate economic effects. They demonstrate that important differences—asymmetries—in access to information between "borrowers" and "lenders" ("insiders" and "outsiders") in financial transactions affect investment decisions of firms and the organization of financial markets. The original research emphasizes the role of information problems in explaining empirically important links between internal finance and investment, as well as their role in accounting for observed variations in mechanisms for corporate control.

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Auditor's Letter Handbook, Second Edition
Audit Responses Committee
American Bar Association Publishing

Changing Corporate America from Inside Out: Lesbian and Gay Workplace Rights
Nicole C. Raeburn
University of Minnesota Press, 2004

The Changing Roles of Debt and Equity in Financing U.S. Capital Formation
Edited by Benjamin M. Friedman
University of Chicago Press, 1982

This volume, consisting of papers presented at a conference held at Williamsburg, Va., 2-3 April 1981, is a progress report on the National Bureau of Economic Research project, The Changing Roles of Debt and Equity in Financing U.S. Capital Formation. The National Bureau has undertaken this project—including the conference, the research described in this volume, and the publication of the volume itself—with the support of the American Council of Life Insurance.

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Collaborative Entrepreneurship: How Communities of Networked Firms Use Continuous Innovation to Create Economic Wealth
Raymond E. Miles, Grant Miles, and Charles C. Snow
Stanford University Press, 2005

Anticipating the future environment of business, Collaborative Entrepreneurship discusses a revolutionary new competitive strategy of continuous innovation that fulfills the need for efficient provision of a constant stream of new products, services, and markets. The book explains how firms can build a collaborative community within which they can freely share in the creation of wealth through innovation with the assurance that the wealth they create will be equitably distributed.

Today, the ability of firms to innovate is restricted by barriers both inside the firm and within their existing markets—barriers that produce limited knowledge utilization and incremental innovations. Collaborative Entrepreneurship describes how these barriers can be overcome so that shared knowledge can drive continuous, sustained innovation across a network of firms and markets.

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Controlling Unlawful Organizational Behavior: Social Structure and Corporate Misconduct
Diane Vaughan
University of Chicago Press, 1985

Diane Vaughan reconstructs the Ohio Revco case, an example of Medicaid provider fraud in which a large drugstore chain initiated a computer-generated double billing scheme that cost the state and federal government half a million dollars in Medicaid funds, funds that the company believed were rightfully theirs. Her analysis of this incident—why the crime was committed, how it was detected, and how the case was built—provides a fascinating inside look at computer crime. Vaughan concludes that organizational misconduct could be decreased by less regulation and more sensitive bureaucratic response.
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Corporate America and Environmental Policy: How Often Does Business Get Its Way?
Sheldon Kamieniecki
Stanford University Press, 2006

This book adds to the environmental politics and policy literature by conducting a comprehensive investigation of business influence in agenda building and environmental policymaking in the United States over time. As part of this investigation, the author presents an analysis of six cases in which private firms were involved in disputes concerning pollution control and natural resource management.

In addition to determining how much business interests influence environmental and natural resource policy, the book tests possible explanations for their level of success in shaping the government's agenda and policy. The study offers a general conceptual framework for analyzing the influence of corporate America over environmental policymaking. The research then explores how much firms have influenced Congress, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and certain natural resource agencies, and the courts on environmental and natural issues since the beginning of the environmental movement in 1970. No other study has examined the ability of business to influence environmental policy in all three branches of government and in such detail.

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Corporate Bodies and Guilty Minds: The Failure of Corporate Criminal Liability
William S. Laufer
University of Chicago Press, 2006

We live in an era defined by corporate greed and malfeasance—one in which unprecedented accounting frauds and failures of compliance run rampant. In order to calm investor fears, revive perceptions of legitimacy in markets, and demonstrate the resolve of state and federal regulators, a host of reforms, high-profile investigations, and symbolic prosecutions have been conducted in response. But are they enough?

In this timely work, William S. Laufer argues that even with recent legal reforms, corporate criminal law continues to be ineffective. As evidence, Laufer considers the failure of courts and legislatures to fashion liability rules that fairly attribute blame for organizations. He analyzes the games that corporations play to deflect criminal responsibility. And he also demonstrates how the exchange of cooperation for prosecutorial leniency and amnesty belies true law enforcement. But none of these factors, according to Laufer, trumps the fact that there is no single constituency or interest group that strongly and consistently advocates the importance and priority of corporate criminal liability. In the absence of a new standard of corporate liability, the power of regulators to keep corporate abuses in check will remain insufficient.
           
A necessary corrective to our current climate of graft and greed, Corporate Bodies and Guilty Minds will be essential to policymakers and legal minds alike.
 
“[This] timely work offers a dispassionate analysis of problems relating to corporate crime.”—Harvard Law Review
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Corporate Capital Structures in the United States
Edited by Benjamin M. Friedman
University of Chicago Press, 1985

The research reported in this volume represents the second stage of a wide-ranging National Bureau of Economic Research effort to investigate "The Changing Role of Debt and Equity in Financing U.S. Capital Formation." The first group of studies sponsored under this project, which have been published individually and summarized in a 1982 volume bearing the same title (Friedman 1982), addressed several key issues relevant to corporate sector behavior along with such other aspects of the evolving financial underpinnings of U.S. capital formation as household saving incentives, international capital flows, and government debt management. In the project's second series of studies, presented at the National Bureau of Economic Research conference in January 1983 and published here for the first time along with commentaries from that conference, the central focus is the financial side of capital formation undertaken by the U.S. corporate business sector. At the same time, because corporations' securities must be held, a parallel focus is on the behavior of the markets that price these claims.
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Corporate Social Audit, The
Raymond A. Bauer
Russell Sage Foundation, 1972

Much has been said about the general subject [of how to measure a corporation's social performance] but little has been contributed to answering this fundamental question. Thus, in November 1971, Russell Sage Foundation sponsored a development effort aimed at examining the "state-of-the-art" and at suggesting a program of research that would advance that state.

"Raymond Bauer and Dan Fenn have provided us with a first product—a state-of-the-art conception and description, and recommendations for future development. They are to be commended for their astute considerations and their clear thinking in the murky pond of corporate social audits. Their effort has provided the social science community with a point of departure for future research in the area."—Eleanor Bernert Sheldon

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Corporation 2020: Transforming Business for Tomorrow's World
Pavan Sukhdev
Island Press, 2012

There is an emerging consensus that all is not well with today’s market-centric economic model. Although it has delivered wealth over the last half century and pulled millions out of poverty, it is recession-prone, leaves too many unemployed, creates ecological scarcities and environmental risks, and widens the gap between the rich and the poor. Around $1 trillion a year in perverse subsidies and barriers to entry for alternative products maintain “business-as-usual” while obscuring their associated environmental and societal costs. The result is the broken system of social inequity, environmental degradation, and political manipulation that marks today’s corporations.
 
We aren’t stuck with this dysfunctional corporate model, but business needs a new DNA if it is to enact the comprehensive approach we need. Pavan Sukhdev lays out a sweeping new vision for tomorrow’s corporation: one that will increase human wellbeing and social equity, decrease environmental risks and ecological losses, and still generate profit. Through a combination of internal changes in corporate governance and external regulations and policies, Corporation 2020 can become a reality in the next decade—and it must, argues Sukhdev, if we are to avert catastrophic social imbalance and ecological harm.
 
Corporation 2020 presents new approaches to measuring the true costs of business and the corporation’s obligation to society. From his insightful look into the history of the corporation to his thoughtful discussion of the steps needed to craft a better corporate model, Sukhdev offers a hopeful vision for the role of business in shaping a more equitable, sustainable future.
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Corruption and Reform: Lessons from America's Economic History
Edited by Edward L. Glaeser and Claudia Goldin
University of Chicago Press, 2006

Despite recent corporate scandals, the United States is among the world’s least corrupt nations. But in the nineteenth century, the degree of fraud and corruption in America approached that of today’s most corrupt developing nations, as municipal governments and robber barons alike found new ways to steal from taxpayers and swindle investors. In Corruption and Reform, contributors explore this shadowy period of United States history in search of better methods to fight corruption worldwide today.

Contributors to this volume address the measurement and consequences of fraud and corruption and the forces that ultimately led to their decline within the United States. They show that various approaches to reducing corruption have met with success, such as deregulation, particularly “free banking,” in the 1830s. In the 1930s, corruption was kept in check when new federal bureaucracies replaced local administrations in doling out relief.  Another deterrent to corruption was the independent press, which kept a watchful eye over government and business. These and other facets of American history analyzed in this volume make it indispensable as background for anyone interested in corruption today.
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Crime and Justice, Volume 18: Beyond the Law: Crime in Complex Organizations
Edited by Michael Tonry and Albert J. Reiss Jr.
University of Chicago Press, 1994

This collection explores structural incentives and disincentives to anti-social and unlawful behaviors and the roles of self- regulation, administrative agencies, and civil and criminal sanctions in shaping organizational behavior. Included are articles on organizational crime, the savings and loan industry, insider trading, industrial water pollution, garbage collection, and the nursing home industry.
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Does Business Learn?: Tax Breaks, Uncertainty, and Political Strategies
Sandra L. Suarez
University of Michigan Press, 2000

Firms in the United States have many political advantages when compared to other groups in society. They are the best-represented group in our nation's capital; they operate more Political Action Committees; and their lobbyists are among the most experienced political operatives. Yet firms are uncertain about their political power and hence about the effectiveness of their political strategies. This book deals with how firms decide which strategy to pursue among the existing alternatives when it comes to defending policies that play to their interests.
Sandra Suárez looks at the efforts of business to influence government policy in a detailed study of the efforts of major American corporations to protect the tax credit applicable to profits from investments in Puerto Rico. This rare longitudinal case-study explores the abilities of U.S. pharmaceutical and electronics companies to adapt their political strategies to a fluid and uncertain political environment. Drawing on interviews with tax lawyers, corporate lobbyists and government officials, the author follows the behavior of the same group of companies over the past twenty years.
This book advances a learning-based explanation of business political behavior, which argues that past political experience accounts for patterns of political behavior that government structures and salient issues alone cannot explain. Centered on attempts to protect an important tax break for business, the possessions tax battles provide an appropriate case for examining the value of the business learning approach.
Although written with a political science audience in mind, this book addresses issues that will resonate widely with sociologists, management researchers and students alike.
Sandra L. Suárez is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, Temple University.
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Economic Factors in the Growth of Corporate Giving
Ralph Lowell Nelson
Russell Sage Foundation, 1970

Examines the dramatic changes in the philanthropic behavior of business corporations in their support of education, health, welfare, and the arts. This analysis shows how traditional patterns of corporate philanthropy have undergone changes across the years, and how, presently, a favorable attitude exists toward giving. The author traces these shifts through periods of depression, war, and peace. He examines economic and non-economic reasons for the growth of corporate giving, and treats the innovative role of company-sponsored foundations.
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Enduring Success: What We Can Learn from the History of Outstanding Corporations
Christian Stadler
Stanford University Press, 2011

Enduring Success addresses a key question in business today: How can companies succeed over time? To learn the source of enduring greatness, author Christian Stadler directed a team of eight researchers in a six-year study of some of Europe's oldest and most stellar companies, targeting nine that have survived for more than 100 years and have significantly outperformed the market over the past fifty years. Readers may wonder, "Why European companies?" Yet, Europe is the ideal place to seek the key to long-term success; half of the Fortune Global 500 companies that are 100 years old or older can be found in Europe, as can 72 of the 100 oldest family businesses in the world.

Fifteen years after Collins and Porras' Built to Last, this new book incorporates fresh insights from management science and provides the first non-US perspective on long-range success. Through Stadler's study, a counterintuitive story emerges: the greatest companies adapt to a constantly changing environment by being intelligently conservative. Enduring Success provides a coherent framework, grounded in five principles and practical concepts, for business leaders who are prepared to learn from the history of some of the world's greatest institutions. View the author's YouTube channel for more discussion of the book.
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The Executive Way: Conflict Management in Corporations
Calvin Morrill
University of Chicago Press, 1995

What causes conflict among high-level American corporate executives? How do executives manage their conflicts? Based on candid interviews with over two hundred executives and their support personnel, Calvin Morrill provides an intimate portrait of these men and women as they cope with problems usually hidden from those outside their exclusive ranks.

Personal and corporate scandals, compensation battles, budget worries, interdepartmental rivalries, personal enmities, and general rancor are among everyday challenges faced by executives. Morrill shows what most influences the way managers handle routine conflicts are the cultures created by their company's organizational structure: whether there is a strong hierarchy, a weak hierarchy, or an absence of any strong central authority. The issues most likely to cause conflict within corporations Morrill identifies as managerial style, competition between departments, and performance evaluations, promotions, and compensation.

Among the people whose day-to-day lives we get to know are Jacobs, a divisional executive whose intuitive understanding of the corporate hierarchy enables him to topple his incompetent superior without direct confrontation; Fuller, who through a mix of brains, guile, and connections rises from staff executive secretary to corporate vice president in a large bank; Green, an old-fashioned accounting partner in a firm being taken over by management consultants; and the "Princess of Power," "Iron Man," and the "Terminator"—executives fighting their way to the top of a successful entertainment company.

Unprecedented in its direct access to top managers, this portrayal of daily life and conflict management among corporate elites will be of interest to professionals, scholars, and practitioners in organizational culture and behavior, managerial decision making, dispute, social control, law and society, and organizational ethnography.
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The Fable of the Keiretsu: Urban Legends of the Japanese Economy
Yoshiro Miwa and J. Mark Ramseyer
University of Chicago Press, 2006

For Western economists and journalists, the most distinctive facet of the post-war Japanese business world has been the keiretsu, or the insular business alliances among powerful corporations. Within keiretsu groups, argue these observers, firms preferentially trade, lend money, take and receive technical and financial assistance, and cement their ties through cross-shareholding agreements. In The Fable of the Keiretsu, Yoshiro Miwa and J. Mark Ramseyer demonstrate that all this talk is really just urban legend.

In their insightful analysis, the authors show that the very idea of the keiretsu was created and propagated by Marxist scholars in post-war Japan. Western scholars merely repatriated the legend to show the culturally contingent nature of modern economic analysis. Laying waste to the notion of keiretsu, the authors debunk several related “facts” as well: that Japanese firms maintain special arrangements with a “main bank,” that firms are systematically poorly managed, and that the Japanese government guided post-war growth. In demolishing these long-held assumptions, they offer one of the few reliable chronicles of the realities of Japanese business.
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The FCPA and UK Bribery Act
Vivian Robinson QC, Stuart H. Deming, and Truman K. Butler
American Bar Association Publishing, 2013

Federal Tax Policy and Charitable Giving
Charles T. Clotfelter
University of Chicago Press, 1985

The United States is distinctive among Western countries in its reliance on nonprofit institutions to perform major social functions. This reliance is rooted in American history and is fostered by federal tax provisions for charitable giving. In this study, Charles T. Clotfelter demonstrates that changes in tax policy—effected through legislation or inflation—can have a significant impact on the level and composition of giving.

Clotfelter focuses on empirical analysis of the effects of tax policy on charitable giving in four major areas: individual contributions, volunteering, corporate giving, and charitable bequests. For each area, discussions of economic theory and relevant tax law precede a review of the data and methodology used in econometric studies of charitable giving. In addition, new econometric analyses are presented, as well as empirical data on the effect of taxes on foundations.

While taxes are not the most important determinant of contributions, the results of the analyses presented here suggest that charitable deductions, as well as tax rates and other aspects of the tax system, are significant factors in determining the size and distribution of charitable giving. This work is a model for policy-oriented research efforts, but it also supplies a major (and very timely) addition to the evidence that must inform future proposals for tax reform.
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Financing Corporate Capital Formation
Edited by Benjamin M. Friedman
University of Chicago Press, 1986

Six leading economists examine the financing of corporate capital formation in the U.S. economy. In clear and nontechnical terms, their papers provide valuable information for economists and nonspecialists interested in such questions as why interest rates are so high, why corporate debt has accelerated in recent years, and how government debt affects private financial markets.

Addressing these questions, the contributors focus chiefly on three themes: the actual use of debt and equity financing by corporations in recent years; the factors that drive the financial markets' pricing of debt and equity securities; and the relationship between corporations' real investment decisions and their financial decisions. While some of the papers are primarily expository, others break new ground. Extending his previous work, Robert Taggart finds a closer relationship between corporate and government debt than has been supposed. Zvi Bodie, Alex Kane, and Robert McDonald conclude in their study that the volatility of interest rates under the Volcker regime has led to a rise in real interest rates because of investors' demand for a greater risk premium. All of the papers present empirical findings in a useful analytical framework.

For its new findings and for its expert overview of issues central to an understanding of the U.S. economy, Financing Corporate Capital Formation should be of both historical and practical interest to students of economics and practitioners in the corporate and financial community.
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The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Handbook, Second Edition
Robert W. Tarun
American Bar Association Publishing, 2011

The Fracturing of the American Corporate Elite
Mark S. Mizruchi
Harvard University Press, 2013

Critics warn that corporate leaders have too much influence over American politics. Mark Mizruchi worries they exert too little. American CEOs have abdicated their civic responsibilities in helping the government address national challenges, with grave consequences for society. A sobering assessment of the dissolution of America’s business class.
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Green at Work: Finding a Business Career that Works for the Environment
Susan Cohn
Island Press, 1995

Green at Work, published by Island Press in 1992, was the first source of information to help nontechnical but environmentally concerned job seekers learn about career opportunities with environmental companies or within the newly emerging "green" corporate culture. Now entirely revised and expanded, this indispensable volume again offers invaluable tools and strategies for launching a green career.Susan Cohn has expanded her scope beyond the business world to examine environmentally focused, nontechnical careers in a wide variety of fields, including communications, banking and finance, consulting, public policy, the non-profit sector, and more. This completely updated edition includes: profiles of more than 70 individuals that illustrate how people have woven their skills, values, and passions into their work listings of more than 400 companies with contact names, addresses, phone numbers, information on what the company does, and its environmental programs and policies listings of more than 50 resources, including organizations, publications, and other sources of information a bibliography of recommended readings
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How Russia Really Works: The Informal Practices That Shaped Post-Soviet Politics and Business
by Alena V. Ledeneva
Cornell University Press, 2006

During the Soviet era, blat—the use of personal networks for obtaining goods and services in short supply and for circumventing formal procedures—was necessary to compensate for the inefficiencies of socialism. The collapse of the Soviet Union produced a new generation of informal practices. In How Russia Really Works, Alena V. Ledeneva explores practices in politics, business, media, and the legal sphere in Russia in the 1990s—from the hiring of firms to create negative publicity about one's competitors, to inventing novel schemes of tax evasion and engaging in "alternative" techniques of contract and law enforcement.

Ledeneva discovers ingenuity, wit, and vigor in these activities and argues that they simultaneously support and subvert formal institutions. They enable corporations, the media, politicians, and businessmen to operate in the post-Soviet labyrinth of legal and practical constraints but consistently undermine the spirit, if not the letter, of the law. The "know-how" Ledeneva describes in this book continues to operate today and is crucial to understanding contemporary Russia.

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Issues in Pension Economics
Edited by Zvi Bodie, John B. Shoven, and David A. Wise
University of Chicago Press, 1987

In the past several decades, pension plans have become one of the most significant institutional influences on labor and financial markets in the U.S. In an effort to understand the economic effects of this growth, the National Bureau of Economic Research embarked on a major research project in 1980. Issues in Pension Economics, the third in a series of four projected volumes to result from thsi study, covers a broad range of pension issues and utilizes new and richer data sources than have been previously available.

The papers in this volume cover such issues as the interaction of pension-funding decisions and corporate finances; the role of pensions in providing adequate and secure retirement income, including the integration of pension plans with social security and significant drops in the U.S. saving rate; and the incentive effects of pension plans on labor market behavior and the implications of plans on labor market behavior and the implications of plans for different demographic groups.

Issues in Pension Economics offers important empirical studies and makes valuable theoretical contributions to current thinking in an area that will most likely continue to be a source of controversy and debate for some time to come. The volume should prove useful to academics and policymakers, as well as to members of the business and labor communities.
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It's Legal but It Ain't Right: Harmful Social Consequences of Legal Industries
Nikos Passas and Neva Goodwin
University of Michigan Press, 2004

Many U.S. corporations and the goods they produce negatively impact our society without breaking any laws. We are all too familiar with the tobacco industry's effect on public health and health care costs for smokers and nonsmokers, as well as the role of profit in the pharmaceutical industry's research priorities. It's Legal but It Ain't Right tackles these issues, plus the ethical ambiguities of legalized gambling, the firearms trade, the fast food industry, the pesticide industry, private security companies, and more. Aiming to identify industries and goods that undermine our societal values and to hold them accountable for their actions, this collection makes a valuable contribution to the ongoing discussion of ethics in our time.

This accessible exploration of corporate legitimacy and crime will be important reading for advocates, journalists, students, and anyone interested in the dichotomy between law and legitimacy.
Nikos Passas is Professor in the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University.

Neva Goodwin is Co-director of the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University.

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Making America Corporate, 1870-1920
Olivier Zunz
University of Chicago Press, 1990

In this groundbreaking study, Oliver Zunz examines how the growth of corporations changed
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THE OWNERSHIP OF ENTERPRISE
Henry HANSMANN
Harvard University Press, 1996

Philanthropy and the Business Corporation
Marion R. Fremont-Smith
Russell Sage Foundation

Attempts to study corporation philanthropy inevitably prove frustrating, for it is a subject surrounded by rhetoric and almost entirely devoid of hard facts.

Marion R. Fremont-Smith's concise appraisal of corporation philanthropy takes a close look at the donative policies of corporations and their methods of giving. Concentrating on the legal and historical setting, as well as corporation philanthropy in practice, the author analyzes recent expansion in the field of traditional philanthropy and the accompanying shift in public attitude toward the responsibility of business corporations. The book shows how this new attitude has brought with it a reappraisal of the philosophical and legal bases for corporate action in the social sphere. In conclusion, Mrs. Fremont-Smith calls for a more imaginative and independent definition of the objectives of corporate philanthropic policies and not merely a continuing series of ill-considered defensive reactions.

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The Physics of Business Growth: Mindsets, System, and Processes
Edward Hess
Stanford University Press, 2012

Organic business growth is governed by its own natural laws—underlying truths that set the stage for growth and innovation, much in the way that Einstein's law of relativity accounts for the movement of objects in the space-time continuum. The most fundamental law is that uncertainty is the only certainty. Dominating forces are ambiguity and change; the processes at work involve exploration, invention, and experimentation. Unfortunately, these truths run counter to the principles of stability, predictability, and linearity that have long informed the design of our firms.

The Physics of Business Growth helps readers understand how to create growth in today's business environment, providing them a roadmap and a set of practical tools to navigate its challenges. The book lays out a three step formula that will prove invaluable to professionals who have the opportunity to influence growth now, as well as to tomorrow's growth leaders, guiding them in (1) creating the right employee and organizational mindsets to enable growth (2) building an internal corporate growth system, and (3) putting in place processes that result in identifying opportunities, launching growth experiments, and managing a growth portfolio.
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Possessed: Hypnotic Crimes, Corporate Fiction, and the Invention of Cinema
Stefan Andriopoulos
University of Chicago Press, 2008

Silent cinema and contemporaneous literature explored themes of mesmerism, possession, and the ominous agency of corporate bodies that subsumed individual identities. At the same time, critics accused film itself of exerting a hypnotic influence over spellbound audiences. Stefan Andriopoulos shows that all this anxiety over being governed by an outside force was no marginal oddity, but rather a pervasive concern in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
            Tracing this preoccupation through the period’s films—as well as its legal, medical, and literary texts—Andriopoulos pays particular attention to the terrifying notion of murder committed against one’s will. He returns us to a time when medical researchers described the hypnotized subject as a medium who could be compelled to carry out violent crimes, and when films like The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler famously portrayed the hypnotist’s seemingly unlimited power on the movie screen. Juxtaposing these medicolegal and cinematic scenarios with modernist fiction, Andriopoulos also develops an innovative reading of Kafka’s novels, which center on the merging of human and corporate bodies.
            Blending theoretical sophistication with scrupulous archival research and insightful film analysis, Possessed adds a new dimension to our understanding of today’s anxieties about the onslaught of visual media and the expanding reach of vast corporations that seem to absorb our own identities.
 
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The Power Structure of American Business
Beth A. Mintz and Michael Schwartz
University of Chicago Press, 1985

Mintz and Schwartz offer a fascinating tour of the corporate world. Through an intensive study of interlocking corporate directorates, they show that for the first time in American history the loan making and stock purchasing and selling powers are concentrated in the same hands: the leadership of major financial firms. Their detailed descriptions of corporate case histories include the forced ouster of Howard Hughes from TWA in the late fifties as a result of lenders' pressure; the collapse of Chrysler in the late seventies owing to banks' refusal to provide further capital infusions; and the very different "rescues" of Pan American Airlines and Braniff Airlines by bank intervention in the seventies.
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Rethinking Purpose Of Business
S. A. Cortright
University of Notre Dame Press, 2002

Rethinking the Purpose of Business challenges reigning shareholder and stakeholder management theories using philosophical and theological dimensions of the Catholic social tradition. In this useful book, the contributors, including management theorists, moral theologians, economists, ethicists, and attorneys, debate complicated issues such as the ethics of profit seeking, equity and efficiency in the firm, the shareholder value principle, social ethics of corporate management, the principle of subsidiarity, and modern contract theory. While the contributors to this thought-provoking volume share a respect for the power of markets, they also assign value to community, common goods, and personal virtue. Essays combine organizational and management theory with philosophical and theological accounts of human purpose. A central argument of this collection is that the tradition of Catholic social thought provides principles that enable fruitful conversations across disciplines regarding the purpose of business and economic activity. Contributors Michael Naughton, Jean-Yves Calvez, Charles Clark, S. A. Cortright, and Ernest Pierucci discuss the anthropological implications of the current shareholder and stakeholder theories. Robert Kennedy, James Gordley, and Dennis McCann assess the communitarian and personal principles of traditional Catholic social teaching as they relate to organizational and managerial theories. Peter Koslowski, Domènec Melé, Lee Tavis, and Timothy Fort consider how Catholic social principles ought to reshape our understanding of the firm. Jeff Gates, James Murphy, and David Pyke consider how concrete practices in ownership and job design should be affected. S. A. CORTRIGHT is associate professor of philosophy and tutor, Integral Curriculum of Liberal Arts, Saint Mary's College of California, where he also serves as Director of the John F. Henning Institute. MICHAEL J. NAUGHTON is Director of the John A. Ryan Institute for Catholic Social Thought at the Center for Catholic Studies, St. Thomas University, St. Paul, Minnesota, as well as associate professor with joint appointments in the Department of Theology and the Graduate School of Business. ---------- "… a selection of impressive and insightful essays by erudite authors concerning business management theories that remain in harmony with social traditions of Catholicism … Rethinking the Purpose of Business is thoughtful and thought-provoking reading which is especially commended to anyone seeking to balance the requirements of faith with the demands of commerce." --The Midwest Book Review "At this time in America's history, when business scandals of unimaginable proportions make regular headlines, a volume like this can serve as a starting point for changing the way business is taught in our colleges and universities." --Research News and Opportunities in Science and Theology "[A]n earnest collection of essays on what Catholic social teaching has to say about business and corporations and our role in them." --Commonweal "The main benefit of this book is that it shows how widespread the interest is among scholars and businesspeople to use the categories of Catholic social thought to understand business activity." --Markets & Morality
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The Rise of the Anti-Corporate Movement: Corporations and the People who Hate Them
Evan Osborne
Stanford University Press, 2009

Against the backdrop of Enron and other high-profile cases of corporate malfeasance, it is easy to paint today's executives as villains--to blame big business, and corporations generally, for a wide array of social ills. Is the criticism warranted? Not quite, says Evan Osborne.

In this provocative book, Osborne pulls back the curtain to illuminate how corporations have evolved as an essential element of society, and how opposition to them is out of proportion—a fire fanned by anti-business activists, the media, and other groups. He sets the record straight, explaining how corporations work and how they have evolved in the context of other institutions. He outlines the net benefits that corporations provide and where increasingly strident antibusiness arguments fail to stand up to scrutiny. The text investigates corporate influence over politics and the government; corporate influence in the media; corporate influence through marketing; some of the pros and cons of globalization; the extent to which business has responded to public demands for social responsibility; and the extent to which free commerce improves society. The result is a fascinating commentary on our love-hate relationship with business.

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Selected Works of Merton H. Miller: A Celebration of Markets: Volume 1: Finance
Merton H. Miller
University of Chicago Press, 2002

Widely regarded as one of the founders of modern corporate finance, Merton H. Miller was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1990 for his work in the theory of finance and financial economics. Selected Works of Merton H. Miller gathers together in two volumes a selection of Miller's most influential contributions over more than fifty years of active research. A common theme running throughout both volumes is Miller's conviction about the utility of market-based approaches to topics as diverse as dividend policy, bank regulation, the structure of securities markets, and competition between research universities and teaching colleges.

Miller was perhaps best known for a series of highly influential papers he cowrote in the 1950s and 1960s with fellow Nobel laureate Franco Modigliani that advanced a set of capital structure theorems later dubbed the "M and M propositions." In brief, the M and M propositions state that the actions of investors, firms, and capital markets will cause the market value of a firm to be independent of its capital structure. In other words, a corporation's value depends on its investments in people, ideas, and physical capital goods and not on the mix of bonds, stocks, and other securities used to finance the investments. Four of these papers are reprinted here, together with important later work by Miller in macroeconomics, corporate capital structure, management science, asset pricing, and the economic and regulatory problems of the financial services industry.

Diverse and innovative, the papers in Selected Works of Merton H. Miller will interest students and practitioners of economics, finance, and business, as well as policymakers responsible for market regulation.
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Selected Works of Merton H. Miller: A Celebration of Markets: Volume 2: Economics
Merton H. Miller
University of Chicago Press, 2002

Widely regarded as one of the founders of modern corporate finance, Merton H. Miller was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1990 for his work in the theory of finance and financial economics. Selected Works of Merton H. Miller gathers together in two volumes a selection of Miller's most influential contributions over more than fifty years of active research. A common theme running throughout both volumes is Miller's conviction about the utility of market-based approaches to topics as diverse as dividend policy, bank regulation, the structure of securities markets, and competition between research universities and teaching colleges.

Miller was perhaps best known for a series of highly influential papers he cowrote in the 1950s and 1960s with fellow Nobel laureate Franco Modigliani that advanced a set of capital structure theorems later dubbed the "M and M propositions." In brief, the M and M propositions state that the actions of investors, firms, and capital markets will cause the market value of a firm to be independent of its capital structure. In other words, a corporation's value depends on its investments in people, ideas, and physical capital goods and not on the mix of bonds, stocks, and other securities used to finance the investments. Four of these papers are reprinted here, together with important later work by Miller in macroeconomics, corporate capital structure, management science, asset pricing, and the economic and regulatory problems of the financial services industry.

Diverse and innovative, the papers in Selected Works of Merton H. Miller will interest students and practitioners of economics, finance, and business, as well as policymakers responsible for market regulation.
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Shifting the Burden: The Struggle over Growth and Corporate Taxation
Cathie J. Martin
University of Chicago Press, 1991

Since World War II, the corporate tax burden has, overall, decreased enormously as a percentage of the government's total revenue. Until now, however, no explanation of this phenomenon has accounted for the periodic reforms—such as the dramatic 1986 Tax Reform Act—which significantly increase some corporate taxes.

Remarkably accessible and rich in historical evidence, Shifting the Burden is the most compelling explanation to date of how our nation's tax policy is formulated. Cathie J. Martin shows how presidents' cultivation of allies within the business community and struggles within that community itself combine to shape tax policy.
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Technocapitalism: A Critical Perspective on Technological Innovation and Corporatism
Luis Suarez-Villa
Temple University Press, 2012

A new version of capitalism, grounded in technology and science, is spawning new forms of corporate power and organization that will have major implications for the twenty-first century. Technological creativity is thereby turned into a commodity in new corporate regimes that are primarily oriented toward research and intellectual appropriation. This phenomenon is likely to have major social, economic, and political consequences, as the new corporatism becomes ever more intrusive and rapacious through its control over technology and innovation.

In his provocative book Technocapitalism, Luis Suarez-Villa addresses this phenomenon from the perspective of radical political economy and social criticism. Grounded in the premise that relations of power influence how human creativity and technology are exploited by the new corporatism, the author argues that new forms of democratic participation and resistance are needed, if the social pathologies created by this new version of capitalism are to be checked.

Considering the new sectors affected by technocapitalism, such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, bioinformatics, and genomics, Suarez-Villa deciphers the common threads of power and organization that drive their corporatization. These new sectors, and the corporate apparatus set up to extract profit and power through them, are imposing standards, creating business models, molding social governance, and influencing social relations at all levels. The new reality they create is likely to affect most every aspect of human existence, including work, health, life, and nature itself.
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Too Big to Jail: How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations
Brandon L. Garrett
Harvard University Press, 2014

American courts routinely hand down harsh sentences to individuals, but a very different standard of justice applies to corporations. Too Big to Jail takes readers into a complex, compromised world of backroom deals, for an unprecedented look at what happens when criminal charges are brought against a major company in the United States.
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Work, Inc.: A Philosophical Inquiry
Edmund F. Byrne
Temple University Press, 1992

Many workers today feel that the longstanding social contract between government, business, and labor has been broken. This book examines legal and philosophical problems that must be addressed if there is to be a new social contract that is fair to workers. Drawing on a wide variety of sources, from the popular press to technical philosophy, Edmund F. Byrne brings into focus ethical issues involved in corporate decisions to reorganize, relocate, or automate. In assessing the human costs of these decisions, he shows why, to a worker, "corporations are not reducible to their assets and liabilities any more than a government is merely its annual budget. That they are organizations, that these organizations do things, and that they are socially responsible for what they do."

In support of this assignment of responsibility, Byrne seeks to demythologize corporate hegemony by confronting a variety of intellectual "dragons" that guard the gates of the status quo. These include legal assumptions about corporate personhood and commodification, private property and eminent domain; management ideas about the autonomous employee and profit without payrolls; technocratic dreams of a dehumanized workplace: ideological belief in progress and competition; and philosophical arguments for libertarian freedom, liberal welfare, and global justice.

Because of these and other mainstream perspectives, workers today are widely perceived, in law and in common parlance, to be isolated atoms. But, Byrne emphasizes, work. including work done for a transnational corporation, is done in a community. Since corporate leaders make decisions that have an impact on people’s lives and on communities, involvement in such decisions must be not only corporate or governmental but community-based as well.

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